The “Crane” famile at Valhalla

I pulled into my driveway yesterday and what did I see? A family of Cranes… I have never in all the years we have lived here seen these curious birds on our property. What a delight it was to see them & photograph them. They were cruisin’ for quite awhile on the property.

Mom Crane Dad Crane Baby Crane

 

Crane (bird)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Crane
Double Trouble (4919788838).jpg
Sandhill cranes
(Antigone canadensis)
 
 

Cranes are a family, the Gruidae, of large, long-legged, and long-necked birds in the group Gruiformes. The 15 species of cranes are placed in 3 genera, Antigone, Balearica, and Grus. Unlike the similar-looking but unrelated herons, cranes fly with necks outstretched, not pulled back. Cranes live on all continents except Antarctica and South America.

They are opportunistic feeders that change their diets according to the season and their own nutrient requirements. They eat a range of items from suitably sized small rodents, fish, amphibians, and insects to grain and berries.

Cranes construct platform nests in shallow water, and typically lay two eggs at a time. Both parents help to rear the young, which remain with them until the next breeding season.[1]

Some species and populations of cranes migrate over long distances; others do not migrate at all. Cranes are solitary during the breeding season, occurring in pairs, but during the nonbreeding season, they are gregarious, forming large flocks where their numbers are sufficient.

Most species of cranes have been affected by human activities and are at the least classified as threatened, if not critically endangered. The plight of the whooping cranes of North America inspired some of the first US legislation to protect endangered species.

 

Rockin’ Robin~

I was watching this Robin the other day and boy was it busy … you might enjoy the song from youtube near the bottom of this post …while viewing..Did you know only male robins “sing” and they stop singing after the breeding season and… Female robins do not sing, but give alarm notes during the breeding season.

DSC_4188 copyDSC_4223 copyDSC_4206 copyDSC_4224 copy For some worms ~ this is the last thing they will ever see…DSC_4243 copy

 

 

American robin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from American Robin)

The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European robin[2] because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the Old World flycatcher family. The American robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering from southern Canada to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin.[3] According to some sources, the American robin ranks behind only the red-winged blackbird (and just ahead of the introduced European starling and the not-always-naturally occurring house finch) as the most abundant, extant land bird in North America.[4] It has seven subspecies, but only T. m. confinis of Baja California Sur is particularly distinctive, with pale gray-brown underparts.
The American robin is active mostly during the day and assembles in large flocks at night. Its diet consists of invertebrates (such as beetle grubs, earthworms, and caterpillars), fruits, and berries. It is one of the earliest bird species to lay eggs, beginning to breed shortly after returning to its summer range from its winter range. Its nest consists of long coarse grass, twigs, paper, and feathers, and is smeared with mud and often cushioned with grass or other soft materials. It is among the first birds to sing at dawn, and its song consists of several discrete units that are repeated.
The adult robin is preyed upon by hawks, cats, and larger snakes, but when feeding in flocks, it can be vigilant and watch other birds for reactions to predators. Brown-headed cowbirds lay eggs in robin nests (see brood parasite), but robins usually reject the cowbird eggs.

Nice to see you again ~

 

Nice to see this little guy enjoying the sunset at Valhalla ~ it’s been a long time since we have seen one of you here at Valhalla .  This is a big deal for the environment  !  Yer just makin’ a livin’ eh…

 

nature

 

Frog ~  please visit…

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frog